NYT Science

NYT Science

@NYTScience

Followers1.2M
Following469

Science, Medicine, Environment, Space and Cosmos. Sync your calendar with the solar system: http://nyti.ms/2ECMtej

New York, NY
Joined on March 18, 2007
@NYTScience Statistics

We looked inside some of the tweets by @NYTScience and found useful information for you.

Inside 100 Tweets

Time between tweets:
a month
Average replies
4
Average retweets
34
Average likes
68
Tweets with photos
0 / 100
Tweets with videos
0 / 100
Tweets with links
0 / 100

Rankings (sorted by number of followers)

74. in country United States and category Magazines & Journals

146. in country United States and category Media

158. in category Magazines & Journals

784. in category Media

Fun Fact

50% of Twitter users are using the social network via mobile.

This is what's coming up around our solar system in 2018. Get in sync with our calendar:

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“The first thing I think, if you’ve got the symptoms, are you going to live, or are you going to die?” Listen to today's episode of "The Daily"

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In the wild, monarch caterpillars often become food for other animals. Only about 5 percent reach adulthood,That’s before migration, which itself takes a huge toll. But in captivity, all the insects survive: “You’re basically bypassing natural selection.”

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"Sleeping well during a global pandemic might not seem like a top priority," writes scientist Olivia Judson for @nytopinion, "but it should be: Sleep is one of the most effective ways to prepare your body to fight infection."

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What does a boy digging in his family garden have to do with a possible pandemic?

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As the coronavirus lockdowns and travel bans stall tourism, some of Africa's endangered and threatened wildlife is paying a price

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In normal circumstances, vaccine development would take around 10 years. But the pharmaceutical industry is racing to compress this timeline down to about a year for the coronavirus.

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As seismologists everywhere started consulting their instruments, it quickly became apparent that the roar of urban life had turned into a whisper all over the world, in places as far-flung as California and Croatia

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"Many drugs we believed were fantastic ended up killing people," Dr. Andre Kalil said. "It is so hard to keep explaining that."

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Just as sleep brings the body into a state of deep relaxation, writes Olivia Judson for @nytopinion, bodily relaxation can help bring on sleep, even in the most stressful of times. 

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"The belief that things are not OK is reasonable; the belief that nothing will ever be OK again appears to indicate a clinical condition," writes @Andrew_Solomon for @nytopinion on the widespread danger of social isolation.

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Researchers in Washington State relied on 650 cameras and two million pictures to study the size of the lynx population in the region. What they found wasn't encouraging.

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Critics fear “Tiger King” creates a glamour around tiger ownership, and assigns a folk heroism to the “Joe Exotic” personality that could set back efforts to end the abuse and ownership of big cats

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A new report says research on whether the coronavirus pandemic will subside during the summer is inconclusive

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"It’s not that an antidepressant will make people unafraid of this mysterious and awful virus," writes @Andrew_Solomon for @nytopinion, "nor that a single hug will mitigate their profound aloneness, but they can help."

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The world's seismographs are no longer picking up the din of your daily commute, the pitter-patter of children running to school, the "Messiquakes" when F.C. Barcelona scores a goal

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“We can expect not only poaching of rhinoceros and elephant and other iconic animals, but we can also expect a spike in bushmeat poaching across the continent,” said a conservationist in Botswana

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C.D.C. study of Americans hit hardest by coronavirus reflects trends reported from other countries at earlier stages of the outbreak

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Most New York coronavirus cases were seeded by people who had traveled in Europe, not Asia, an analysis of genomes shows. 

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When she dove in the 36-degree water in a bay 75 miles north of the Antarctic peninsula, she was seeking native coral and sea sponges. Instead she spotted several dozen juvenile invaders clinging to one of her specimens.

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Monarch butterflies seem to be struggling with their annual migration to Mexico, and a study suggests that adding to their numbers with captive breeding is the wrong solution

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